Road ecology blog: maintenance and design issues with wildlife fences, Brazil

July 14, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Image below: a maintenance problem: An animal (probably a nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)) dug a gap under a wildlife fence, burrow is visible on road side of the fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, Brazil. If this gap gets bigger overtime, other species, including medium and large sized mammals may be able to enter the fenced road corridor.

An animal (probably a nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)) dug a gap under a wildlife fence, burrow is visible on road side of the fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, BrazilAn animal (probably a nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)) dug a gap under a wildlife fence, burrow is visible on road side of the fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, BrazilAn animal (probably a nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)) dug a gap under a wildlife fence, burrow is visible on road side of the fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, Brazil

Image below: a design problem: Gutter for drainage results in a gap under a wildlife fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, Brazil

Gutter for drainage results in a gap under a wildlife fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, BrazilGutter for drainage results in a gap under a wildlife fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, BrazilGutter for drainage results in a gap under a wildlife fence, SP-225 motorway, near Brotas, São Paulo, Brazil Click here for images of wildlife fencing.

Click here for images of multifunctional underpasses.

Click here for images of wildlife underpasses.

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