Road ecology blog: researchers at work, canopy crossing, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

February 10, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

With Larissa Oliveira Gonçalves, Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira and Bethanie Walder.

Image below: All business

Larissa Oliveira Gonçalves, Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira and Bethanie Walder at a canopy crossing, near Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilLarissa Oliveira Gonçalves, Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira and Bethanie Walder at a canopy crossing, near Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilLarissa Oliveira Gonçalves, Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira and Bethanie Walder at a canopy crossing, near Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Through the Urban Monkeys Program, six canopy crossings were installed in a neighborhood adjacent to the Lami José Lutzenberger Biological Reserve. The aim of the program is to reduce electric hazards associated with power lines and to reduce road-kills of brown howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans). The power company insulated the power lines in several places, specifically around the canopy crossings. The implementation and monitoring effort of the canopy crossings involved the local community. The following species have been observed using the structures: brown howler monkey (Alouatta guariba clamitans), white-eared opossum (Didelphis albiventris), and orange-spined hairy dwarf porcupine (Sphiggurus villosus).

Image below: Monkey business

Larissa Oliveira Gonçalves, Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira and Bethanie Walder doing their monkey thing at a canopy crossing, near Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilLarissa Oliveira Gonçalves, Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira and Bethanie Walder doing their monkey thing at a canopy crossing, near Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, BrazilLarissa Oliveira Gonçalves, Fernanda Zimmermann Teixeira and Bethanie Walder doing their monkey thing at a canopy crossing, near Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Through the Urban Monkeys Program, six canopy crossings were installed in a neighborhood adjacent to the Lami José Lutzenberger Biological Reserve. The aim of the program is to reduce electric hazards associated with power lines and to reduce road-kills of brown howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans). The power company insulated the power lines in several places, specifically around the canopy crossings. The implementation and monitoring effort of the canopy crossings involved the local community. The following species have been observed using the structures: brown howler monkey (Alouatta guariba clamitans), white-eared opossum (Didelphis albiventris), and orange-spined hairy dwarf porcupine (Sphiggurus villosus).

 


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...

Archive
January February (6) March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April (9) May (1) June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December