Road ecology blog: Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn, Wyoming, USA

July 15, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA.

The Trapper's Point area is a bottleneck in a 150 km (93 mi) long migration corridor of pronghorn between their winter habitat in the Upper Green River Basin and their summer habitat in Grand Teton National Park. This migration corridor is referred to as the "Path of the Pronghorn". The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) constructed 8 wildlife crossing structures (2 overpasses ($2.5 million each) and 6 underpasses) and wildlife fencing (2.4 m (8 ft) tall) along a 21 km (13 mi) long highway section bisecting the migration corridor. The overpasses were designed for pronghorn, a species that is characteristic of open landscapes and that requires long sight distances. Over 90% of the pronghorn that use the 8 structures use the overpasses rather than the underpasses. Other large ungulates in the area are mule deer, elk and moose.

For other images of wildlife overpasses (wildlife only) click here.

For images of multifunctional wildlife overpasses (wildlife, water, humans, non-motorized vehicles, motorized vehicles) click here.

For images of landscape bridges, road tunnels or very wide overpasses over longer road sections click here.

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All content © 2014 Marcel Huijser

 

Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) with earthen berm for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA. The Trapper's Point area is a bottleneck in a 150 km (93 mi) long migration corridor of pronghorn between their winter habitat in the Upper Green River Basin and their summer habitat in Grand Teton National Park. This migration corridor is referred to as the "Path of the Pronghorn". The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) constructed 8 wildlife crossing structures (2 overpasses ($2.5 million each) 6 underpasses) and wildlife fencing (2.4 m (8 ft) tall) along a 21 km (13 mi) long hwy section bisecting the corridor. The overpasses were designed for pronghorn, a species that is characteristic of open landscapes and that requires long sight distances. Over 90% of the pronghorn that use the 8 structures use the overpasses rather than the underpasses. Other large ungulates in the area are mule deer, elk and moose. Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) with earthen berm for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA. The Trapper's Point area is a bottleneck in a 150 km (93 mi) long migration corridor of pronghorn between their winter habitat in the Upper Green River Basin and their summer habitat in Grand Teton National Park. This migration corridor is referred to as the "Path of the Pronghorn". The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) constructed 8 wildlife crossing structures (2 overpasses ($2.5 million each) 6 underpasses) and wildlife fencing (2.4 m (8 ft) tall) along a 21 km (13 mi) long hwy section bisecting the corridor. The overpasses were designed for pronghorn, a species that is characteristic of open landscapes and that requires long sight distances. Over 90% of the pronghorn that use the 8 structures use the overpasses rather than the underpasses. Other large ungulates in the area are mule deer, elk and moose. Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) with earthen berm for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA. The Trapper's Point area is a bottleneck in a 150 km (93 mi) long migration corridor of pronghorn between their winter habitat in the Upper Green River Basin and their summer habitat in Grand Teton National Park. This migration corridor is referred to as the "Path of the Pronghorn". The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) constructed 8 wildlife crossing structures (2 overpasses ($2.5 million each) 6 underpasses) and wildlife fencing (2.4 m (8 ft) tall) along a 21 km (13 mi) long hwy section bisecting the corridor. The overpasses were designed for pronghorn, a species that is characteristic of open landscapes and that requires long sight distances. Over 90% of the pronghorn that use the 8 structures use the overpasses rather than the underpasses. Other large ungulates in the area are mule deer, elk and moose.

Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USAWildlife overpass (west) with earthen berm for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA. The Trapper's Point area is a bottleneck in a 150 km (93 mi) long migration corridor of pronghorn between their winter habitat in the Upper Green River Basin and their summer habitat in Grand Teton National Park. This migration corridor is referred to as the "Path of the Pronghorn". The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) constructed 8 wildlife crossing structures (2 overpasses ($2.5 million each) 6 underpasses) and wildlife fencing (2.4 m (8 ft) tall) along a 21 km (13 mi) long hwy section bisecting the corridor. The overpasses were designed for pronghorn, a species that is characteristic of open landscapes and that requires long sight distances. Over 90% of the pronghorn that use the 8 structures use the overpasses rather than the underpasses. Other large ungulates in the area are mule deer, elk and moose.

 

 


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