Road Ecology blog: Box culvert for turtles, Hwy 69, Ontario, Canada

February 02, 2014  •  Leave a Comment

Road Ecology blog: Box culvert for turtles, Hwy 69, Ontario, Canada.

Turtle underpass, Hwy 69, Ontario, Canada. The turtle underpass is 2.4 m wide and 2.1 m high. There are separate structures for the two travel directions with a fenced opening (15.3 m) in the median. Painted turtle, snapping turtle and northern water snake have been documented using this type of structure along Hwy 69. The large mammal fence is 2.3 m high. Geotextile fabric (black) is attached to the large mammal fence for reptiles and amphibians. The fabric is 0.8 m above the ground and 0.2 m below the ground. A 0.1 m wide strip below the ground is oriented away from the road to reduce the probability that animals dig under the fabric. Based on the research conducted by James Baxter-Gilbert (Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario) the underpass (box culvert) is believed to be suitable for turtles and snakes. However, the geotextile fabric has gaps resulting from installation errors, erosion and flooding. A sturdier barrier (concrete/steel/hard plastic) with reduced maintenance and better oversight during installation is recommended.

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Image below: one of the box culverts for turtles and snakes.

Turtle underpass, Hwy 69, Ontario, CanadaTurtle underpass, Hwy 69, Ontario, CanadaTurtle underpass, Hwy 69, Ontario, Canada. The turtle underpass is 2.4 m wide and 2.1 m high. There are separate structures for the two travel directions with a fenced opening (15.3 m) in the median. Painted turtle, snapping turtle and northern water snake have been documented using this type of structure along Hwy 69. The large mammal fence is 2.3 m high. Geotextile fabric (black) is attached to the large mammal fence for reptiles and amphibians. The fabric is 0.8 m above the ground and 0.2 m below the ground. A 0.1 m wide strip below the ground is oriented away from the road to reduce the probability that animals dig under the fabric. The underpass (box culvert) is believed to be suitable for turtles and snakes, but the geotextile fabric has gaps resulting from installation errors, erosion and flooding. A sturdier barrier (concrete/steel/hard plastic) with reduced maintenance and better oversight during installation is recommended.

 

Image below: the large mammal fence with the geotextile fabric (intended as a barrier for turtles) attached. Large mammal fencing combined with reptile and amphibian fencing, Hwy 69, near Burwash, OntarioLarge mammal fencing combined with reptile and amphibian fencing, Hwy 69, near Burwash, OntarioLarge mammal fencing combined with reptile and amphibian fencing, Hwy 69, near Burwash, Ontario. The large mammal fence is 2.3 m high. Geotextile fabric (black) is attached to the large mammal fence for reptiles and amphibians. The fabric is 0.8 m above the ground and 0.2 m below the ground. A 0.1 m wide strip below the ground is oriented away from the road to reduce the probability that animals dig under the fabric. The geotextile fabric has gaps resulting from installation errors, erosion and flooding. A sturdier barrier (concrete/steel/hard plastic) with reduced maintenance and better oversight during installation is recommended.

 

Image below: James Baxter-Gilbert from Laurentian University at a box culvert for turtles. James Baxter-Gilbert at turtle underpass, Hwy 69, Ontario, CanadaJames Baxter-Gilbert at turtle underpass, Hwy 69, Ontario, CanadaJames Baxter-Gilbert at turtle underpass, Hwy 69, Ontario, Canada. The turle underpass is 2.4 m wide and 2.1 m high. There are seperate structures for the two travel directions with a fenced opening (15.3 m) in the median. Painted turtle, snapping turtle and northern water snake have been documented using this type of structure along Hwy 69. The large mammal fence is 2.3 m high. Geotextile fabric (black) is attached to the large mammal fence for reptiles and amphibians. The fabric is 0.8 m above the ground and 0.2 m below the ground. A 0.1 m wide strip below the ground is oriented away from the road to reduce the probability that animals dig under the fabric. The underpass (box culvert) is believed to be suitable for turtles and snakes, but the geotextile fabric has gaps resulting from installation errors, erosion and flooding. A sturdier barrier (concrete/steel/hard plastic) with reduced maintenance and better oversight during installation is recomended.


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