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Category:Architecture and Structures
Subcategory:Roads
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:slope, slopes, "gradual slope", "gradual approach", approach, "line of sight", "sight distance", grassland, grasslands, prairie, migrations, migration, migrating, migrate, "open landscapes", landscapes, landscape, open, ridge, ridges, "green bridges", "green bridge", bridge, "crossing structures", "crossing structure", habitat, habitat connectivity, fragmentation, connectivity, permeable, antelope, ungulate, ungulates, large, mammals, mammal, wildlife, ecoducts, ecoduct, "safe passages", "safe passage", opportunity, wildlife crossings, wildlife crossing, "Rocky Mountains", "Rocky Mountain", Wyoming, Pinedale, US Hwy 191, long distance, seasonal, movement, movements, "Antilocapra americana", pronghorn, "Path of the Pronghorn", corridor, barrier, barriers, mitigation, mitigation measures, "road ecology"
Photo Info

Dimensions7267 x 4849
Original file size17.7 MB
Image typeJPEG
Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA

Wildlife overpass (west) for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), on the Path of the Pronghorn, Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA

Wildlife overpass (west) with earthen berm for pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) (46 m (150 ft) wide), Trapper’s Point, US Hwy 191, near Pinedale, Wyoming, USA. The Trapper's Point area is a bottleneck in a 150 km (93 mi) long migration corridor of pronghorn between their winter habitat in the Upper Green River Basin and their summer habitat in Grand Teton National Park. This migration corridor is referred to as the "Path of the Pronghorn". The Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) constructed 8 wildlife crossing structures (2 overpasses ($2.5 million each) 6 underpasses) and wildlife fencing (2.4 m (8 ft) tall) along a 21 km (13 mi) long hwy section bisecting the corridor. The overpasses were designed for pronghorn, a species that is characteristic of open landscapes and that requires long sight distances. Over 90% of the pronghorn that use the 8 structures use the overpasses rather than the underpasses. Other large ungulates in the area are mule deer, elk and moose.