17 of 19 photos
Thumbnails
Info
Categories & Keywords

Category:Architecture and Structures
Subcategory:Roads
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:pollution, minimize, visual, disturbance, lights, light, lighted, street, non-motorized, corridor, travel, travelling, recreating, recreate, trail, path, cyclists, cyclist, cycle, bicyclists, bicyclist, "sight distance", lowered, low, lower, road, slope, approach, mitigation measures, "road ecology", green, "green bridge", use, monitoring, camera, species, selective, partial, cattle, horses, "Ovis orientalis", mouflon, "Sus scrofa", "wild boar", "roe deer", "Capreolus capreolus", "Cervus elaphus", "red deer", red deer, verbinding, "Nationaal Park Hoge Veluwe", "National Park Hoge Veluwe", "Hoge Veluwe", "Planken Wambuis", "Oud Reemst", "The Netherlands", Veluwe, ungulates, habitat, fragmentation, defragmentation, barrier, barriers, wildlife, wildlife fences, connectivity, structure, "crossing structure", "crossing opportunity", overpass, bridge, "wildlife bridge", "wildlife overpass", natuurbrug, ecoduct
Photo Info

Dimensions6000 x 4000
Original file size15.2 MB
Image typeJPEG
Street light for bicycle path under wildlife overpass Oud Reemst (about 35 m wide), south of Otterlo, The Netherlands

Street light for bicycle path under wildlife overpass Oud Reemst (about 35 m wide), south of Otterlo, The Netherlands

Street light for bicycle path under wildlife overpass Oud Reemst (about 35 m wide), south of Otterlo, The Netherlands. The street lights are designed to minimize light pollution and disturbance to wildlife on the overpass. This wildlife overpass connects "Planken Wambuis" (west side) to "National Park Hoge Veluwe" (east side). There is a fence (1.10 m high) and gates on the east side of the structure to keep mouflon (Ovis orientalis), a wild sheep species from southern Europe, Asia and Arabia, inside the "Hoge Veluwe". It also keeps horses and cattle in "Planken Wambuis". Roe deer and red deer can easily jump the fence. Presumably wild boar can push against the gates with hinges on the top side of the gate and pass through. Note the road was lowered to allow wildlife to see across to the other side of the structure.