Road ecology blog: Wildlife underpasses, fences and jump-outs, US Hwy 95, Idaho, USA

November 18, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Road ecology blog: Wildlife underpasses, fences and jump-outs, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

Image below: Fernanda Abra investigates a wildlife underpass. Fernanda Abra at wildlife underpass north of Bonners Ferry, NortFernanda Abra at wildlife underpass north of Bonners Ferry, NortFernanda Abra at wildlife underpass north of Bonners Ferry, Northern Idaho, USA

Image below: Fernanda Abra identifies wildlife tracks inside an underpass.

Fernanda Abra at wildlife underpass north of Bonners Ferry, NortFernanda Abra at wildlife underpass north of Bonners Ferry, NortFernanda Abra at wildlife underpass north of Bonners Ferry, Northern Idaho, USA Vegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

Image below: Rocks can provide cover for small mammals, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates inside underpasses.

Boulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

Image below: Wildlife trail leading to and from an underpass.

Boulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA Boulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA Boulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildBoulders and rocks provide cover for small animals inside a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

Image below: wildlife trail leading to underpass.

Vegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA Vegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA Vegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA Vegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

Cover at entrance of wildlife underpass.

Vegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpaVegetation providing cover at the approach of a wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

Image below: Fernanda Abra climbs a wildlife fence.

Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry,Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry,Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry, Northern Idaho, USA Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry,Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry,Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry, Northern Idaho, USA Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry,Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry,Fernanda Abra climbing a wildlife fence, north of Bonners Ferry, Northern Idaho, USA

Image below: A tight connection between the wildlife fence and the wing wall of an underpass is important.

Wildlife fence  has a tight connection to wingwall of wildlife uWildlife fence has a tight connection to wingwall of wildlife uWildlife fence has a tight connection to wingwall of wildlife underpass, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA

Image below: A gap under the fence at what seems to be a seasonal stream.

Gap under a wildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAGap under a wildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAGap under a wildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA. This seems to be an installation issue, or because of teh run-off at certain times of the year. Regardless, the gap allows wildlife to enter the fence road corridor which can result in collisions.

Image below: these rocks seem to be intended to reduce the visibility of the wildlife fence from the road and reduce the effect of the wildlife fence on landscape aesthetics.

Wildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAWildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAWildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA.

Image below: wildlife fence. Wildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAWildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAWildlife fence, US Hwy 95, Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA.

Image below: concrete retaining wall of a wildlife jump-out.

Wildlife jump-out, US Hwy 95, north of Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAWildlife jump-out, US Hwy 95, north of Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USAWildlife jump-out, US Hwy 95, north of Bonners Ferry, Idaho, USA


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...